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Meet the American who invented Band-Aids: cotton buyer and devoted husband Earle Dickson

Source image: https://www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/meet-american-who-invented-band-aids-cotton-buyer-devoted-husband-earle-dickson

There is genius in simplicity, which makes the Band-Aid one of the most brilliant inventions in human history. A little adhesive tape, some cotton — and voila! The world is suddenly better. 

Band-Aids are so ubiquitous and trusted today that it’s hard to imagine the planet or a medicine cabinet without them. 

Yet they are a fairly recent addition to home and professional health care — invented only a century ago by a Johnson & Johnson employee named Earle Dickson. 

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He wasn’t an inventor. He was a cotton buyer for the New Jersey company. And apparently he was one of the all-time great husbands as well.

“In 1917, Dickson married Josephine Frances Knight,” writes the Lemelson-MIT Program, an inventors’ think tank at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Earle Dickson was a newlywed in about 1920 when he conceived an idea to treat common household nicks and cuts. Johnson & Johnson then introduced his innovation as the Band-Aid in 1921.

Earle Dickson was a newlywed in about 1920 when he conceived an idea to treat common household nicks and cuts. Johnson & Johnson then introduced his innovation as the Band-Aid in 1921.
(Courtesy Johnson & Johnson)

“He quickly realized that his new bride seemed to constantly be nicking her fingers while working in the kitchen, and he thought the big bandages he was using to help her treat them were too large and clumsy.”

He found inspiration right there in his own home.

“Earle took two Johnson & Johnson products — adhesive tape and gauze — and combined them to make the first adhesive bandage,” writes Johnson & Johnson company historian Margaret Gurowitz.

Band-Aids are a low-tech invention, which makes their recent addition to our lives all the more surprising.

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Transformative technologies such as the automobile, the miracle of flight and the seemingly impossible feat of transatlantic radio communication were all pioneered two decades or more before the Band-Aid. 

Put another way: People could communicate instantly between New York City and London before they could stick a bandage on a bloody finger.  

Dickson’s clever effort to comfort his wife would soon have an identity. 

Brand-new product

Johnson & Johnson embraced Dickson’s idea — and dubbed the product the Band-Aid. The brilliant brand name is credited to factory superintendent W. Johnson Kenyon, according to a report by The Kiplinger Magazine in 1964.  

Band-Aids hit the market in 1921, peddled at drugstores by traveling salesmen for Johnson & Johnson.  

A vintage Johnson & Johnson Band-Aid box. The product was introduced in 1921.    

A vintage Johnson & Johnson Band-Aid box. The product was introduced in 1921.    
(James Keyser/Getty Images)

The generic term is adhesive bandages. Yet North Americans, and other people around the world, know them by the brand name Band-Aids. 

In the United Kingdom, adhesive bandages are known generically as plasters; the European equivalent of the Band-Aid is the Elastoplast.

Band-Aids have been such a success that the term is used in everyday conversation in American English in place of adhesive bandages — so that the public sees no distinction between the two. 

“His success resulted in the first commercial dressing for small wounds that consumers could apply with ease.”

It’s very much the way we refer to tissues as Kleenex or cotton swabs as Q-Tips.

Whatever they’re called, Dickson’s innovation dramatically improved first aid forever. 

“Dickson created a prototype of cotton gauze and adhesive strips covered with crinoline that could be peeled off to expose the adhesive, easily allowing the gauze and strip to be wrapped over a cut,” writes the National Inventors Hall of Fame. 

“His success resulted in the first commercial dressing for small wounds that consumers could apply with ease, and created a market that continues to thrive today.”

‘Piece of rag around the cut’

Earle Ensign Dickson was born on Oct. 10, 1892 in Grandview, Tennessee, to Dr. Richard Ensign and Minnie (Hester) Dickson.

The dad was a physician from western Massachusetts; the mom hailed from Connecticut. Earle Dickson was an only child after losing his younger brother Mark in infancy, according to U.S. Census records. 

An individual holds a Band-Aid box during the BAND-AID's Fashion Week Glamulance on Sept. 8, 2011, in New York City. 

An individual holds a Band-Aid box during the BAND-AID’s Fashion Week Glamulance on Sept. 8, 2011, in New York City. 
(Kris Connor/Getty Images for Band-Aid)

The New Englanders made their way to Tennessee at some point, though Dickson lived for most of his life in Highland Park, New Jersey, where he found work at Johnson & Johnson sometime around World War I.

Despite massive advancements in battlefield medicine in the Civil War, Dickson was born into a world of primitive household bandaging — largely unchanged for centuries. 

“Most people just used what they had in the house, which many times meant tying a piece of rag around the cut.” — J&J historian Margaret Gurowitz

“People needing a small bandage had to make one themselves, and they were often too cumbersome to be easily applied by one person,” Johnson & Johnson historian Gurowitz claims.

“Most people just used what they had in the house, which many times meant tying a piece of rag around the cut.”

The medical community had in previous decades made new efforts to improve home bandage care.

Earle Dickson invented a new form adhesive bandage, now known as the Band-Aid, at his home in Highland Park, New Jersey. He was inspired to treat his wife, Josephine, who suffered from household nicks and cuts. 

Earle Dickson invented a new form adhesive bandage, now known as the Band-Aid, at his home in Highland Park, New Jersey. He was inspired to treat his wife, Josephine, who suffered from household nicks and cuts. 
(Illustration by Chris Hsu from “The Boo-Boos That Changed the World” by Barry Wittenstein. Used by permission of Charlesbridge. )

“In 1845 Horace H. Day patented a surgical plaster composed of natural rubber and resin coated on cloth,” according to the “Encyclopedia of Modern Everyday Inventions” by David J. Cole, Eve Browning and Fred. E.H. Schroeder.

“Through the 19th century various tapes using natural (uncured) rubber were devised … None of these were aseptic or antiseptic.”

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Few doctors, the authors note, were ready to adopt the germ theory pioneered by English physician Joseph Lister. 

This doctor would soon lend his name to a popular antiseptic mouthwash still in use today: Listerine. Dr. Lister would also inspire the creation of one of the world’s largest companies: Johnson & Johnson. 

Earle Dickson was the right man at the right time with the right product — and working for the right company.

“An American, Robert Wood Johnson, heard Lister speak in 1876 and thought of preparing a commercial line of germ-free surgical dressings,” write Cole, Browning and Schroeder.

“Nine years later he formed a partnership with his two brothers and began manufacturing in New Brunswick, New Jersey, incorporating as Johnson & Johnson in 1887.”

Earle Dickson was the right man at the right time with the right product — and working for the right company.

Johnson & Johnson introduced the Band-Aid in 1921. Its creator, Earle Dickson, filed a patent for his "surgical dressing" on Dec. 29, 1925, and received the patent on Dec. 28, 1926. 

Johnson & Johnson introduced the Band-Aid in 1921. Its creator, Earle Dickson, filed a patent for his “surgical dressing” on Dec. 29, 1925, and received the patent on Dec. 28, 1926. 
(U.S. Patent and Trademark Office)

“Johnson & Johnson was already a popular manufacturer of large cotton and gauze bandages for hospitals and soldiers when Dickson offered up his Band-Aid solution,” reports Lemelson-MIT, adding that Band-Aids first struggled to stick. 

“The original handmade bandages did not sell well; only $3,000 worth of the product was sold during their first year. This may have been because the first versions of the bandages came in sections that were 2-1/2 inches wide and 18 inches long.”

People had to cut off the length of bandage needed to cover the wound. It was clumsy by today’s standards.

Boy Scouts frequently suffered the exact kind of injuries, minor scrapes, cuts and abrasions that Band-Aids best cured.  

Improvements quickly followed. Machine-made Band-Aids of various sizes were introduced in 1924. Sterilized bandages hit the market in 1939. A sheer-vinyl version was introduced in 1958. 

But it would take brilliant marketing employing America’s cut and scrape-prone children to make the Band-Aid a cultural phenomenon. 

America’s kids embrace Band-Aids

Johnson & Johnson found an army of young American adventurers to prove their product out in the field. 

They were the Boy Scouts of America. They frequently suffered the exact kind of injuries, minor scrapes, cuts and abrasions that Band-Aids best cured.

Johnson & Johnson helped popularize Band-Aids in the 1920s by sending them out in the field in first-aid kits for the Boy Scouts of America. The original 1925 "Boy Scout First Aid Packet" had a triangular bandage for a sling, a compress and two safety pins. It came in a cardboard container.

Johnson & Johnson helped popularize Band-Aids in the 1920s by sending them out in the field in first-aid kits for the Boy Scouts of America. The original 1925 “Boy Scout First Aid Packet” had a triangular bandage for a sling, a compress and two safety pins. It came in a cardboard container.
(Boy Scouts of America)

“In the 1920s, the company began distributing, for free, an unlimited supply of Band-Aids to Boy Scout troops across the country,” Scouting Magazine reported in 2018. 

“Band-Aids also were included in the custom first-aid kits Johnson & Johnson produced for the Boy Scouts of America. The kits were designed to help Boy Scouts earn merit badges like First Aid. The original 1925 ‘Boy Scout First Aid Packet’ contained a triangular bandage for a sling, a compress and two safety pins. It came in a simple cardboard container.”

Band-Aids found an international audience when they traveled overseas by the tens of millions with U.S. troops in World War II.

A more advanced Boy Scouts first-aid kit came in tin cans. The Girl Scouts were armed with Johnson & Johnson Band-Aids in 1932. 

Band-Aids found an international audience when they traveled overseas by the tens of millions with U.S troops in World War II. Their service for Allied armed forces furthered the Band-Aid’s visibility and popularity. 

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Band-Aids became a part of bedtime reading after the war, in one of the most successful children’s books in U.S. history. 

“Doctor Dan the Bandage Man,” from Little Golden Books in 1950, tells the tale of a boy named Dan whose “boo-boo” is bettered by a mom when she applies a Band-Aid to his finger.

Transformed by the healing powers of the Band-Aid, Dan spends the rest of the book wheeling the bandages around in his wagon healing neighborhood pals, pets and even toys.

"Doctor Dan the Bandage Man" was published by Little Golden Books in 1950. It featured a boy named Dan who treated local children, pets and toys with Band-Aids. The book came with six Band-Aids and sold millions of copies — helping to popularize the Johnson & Johnson product.

“Doctor Dan the Bandage Man” was published by Little Golden Books in 1950. It featured a boy named Dan who treated local children, pets and toys with Band-Aids. The book came with six Band-Aids and sold millions of copies — helping to popularize the Johnson & Johnson product.
(Penguin Random House)

“The book came with six real Band-Aid Brand Adhesive Bandages — attached inside and advertised on the cover — so that kids could bandage their own hurt toys, should the need arise,” Gurowitz writes.

The publisher printed 1.75 million copies of the book in its first edition alone — putting a total of 10.5 million Band-Aids in the hands of American boys and girls. 

Dickson’s Band-Aid had already proven itself perhaps the most successful home care product in history. Now it entered the realm of pop-culture icon. 

The book was added to the Smithsonian collection at the National Museum of American History, which recognizes the book for its “innovative” display and marketing techniques. 

“Simon and Schuster paired with Johnson & Johnson to promote the latter’s brand-name ‘Band-Aids’ and targeted one of its likeliest consumers, children,” the museum notes. 

Johnson & Johnson helped popularize Band-Aids by packing them in first-aid kits for Boy Scouts. After an initial kit came in a simple cardboard box, Johnson & Johnson debuted an upgraded BSA first-aid kit in a tin box. Inside, scouts found burn and antibiotic creams, first-aid instructions and several kinds of bandages, including Band-Aids.

Johnson & Johnson helped popularize Band-Aids by packing them in first-aid kits for Boy Scouts. After an initial kit came in a simple cardboard box, Johnson & Johnson debuted an upgraded BSA first-aid kit in a tin box. Inside, scouts found burn and antibiotic creams, first-aid instructions and several kinds of bandages, including Band-Aids.
(Boy Scouts of America)

“Boys and girls would sport Band-Aids in colorful shapes of stars, hearts, circles and flowers from samples included in the pages of the book, all the while learning the basics of first aid.”

Dickson’s Band-Aid had already proven itself perhaps the most successful home care product in history. Now it entered the realm of pop-culture icon. 

The Band-Aid Bench

Earle Dickson died in Ontario, Canada, on Sept. 21, 1961. He was 68 years old. 

After his breakthrough contribution to the company, Dickson spent the rest of his professional career working for Johnson & Johnson.

Earle Dickson was born in Tennessee on Oct. 10, 1892. A cotton buyer for Johnson & Johnson, he invented the Band-Aid in his Highland Park, New Jersey, home in 1921. Dickson died in Kitchener, Ontario, on Sept. 21, 1961.

Earle Dickson was born in Tennessee on Oct. 10, 1892. A cotton buyer for Johnson & Johnson, he invented the Band-Aid in his Highland Park, New Jersey, home in 1921. Dickson died in Kitchener, Ontario, on Sept. 21, 1961.
(Courtesy Johnson & Johnson)

“Johnson & Johnson eventually made Dickson a vice president at the company, a position in which he remained until his retirement in 1957,” writes MIT-Lemelson. 

“He was also a member of the board of directors until his death in 1961. At the time of his death, Johnson & Johnson was selling over $30,000,000 worth of Band-Aids each year.”

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The success of Dickson’s product is hard to fathom. 

Johnson & Johnson today produces 10 million Band-Aids every day — about 117 bandages each second. 

Yet Band-Aids have gone far beyond just a “product.” They’re part of the wider cultural lexicon. 

Band-Aid inventor Earle Dickson lived in Highland Park, New Jersey. The community installed a Band-Aid bench on South Fourth Avenue in 2019 in Dickson's honor. Local artist JoAnn Boscarino created it.

Band-Aid inventor Earle Dickson lived in Highland Park, New Jersey. The community installed a Band-Aid bench on South Fourth Avenue in 2019 in Dickson’s honor. Local artist JoAnn Boscarino created it.
(Highland Park Arts Commission)

“Put a Band-Aid on it” or “Band-Aid solution” are common refrains to describe a short-term fix to a problem. 

The British charity ensemble group Band Aid formed in the 1980s to give the world the holiday classic “Do They Know It’s Christmas.” Band Aid inspired Live Aid, the international pop-culture sensation charity concert of 1985. 

Johnson & Johnson today produces 10 million Band-Aids every day — about 117 bandages every second.

The Band-Aids were the name given to the rock-and-roll groupies by writer/producer Cameron Crowe in the movie and stage versions of “Almost Famous.”

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Highland Park, New Jersey, celebrated its hometown medical-inventor hero in 2019, introducing a memorial to Dickson known locally as the “Band-Aid bench.” Local artist JoAnn Boscarino designed it.

It sits on South Fourth Avenue, about two blocks from the Dicksons’ former home on Montgomery Avenue. 

“We’re really proud that Highland Park is known as the birthplace of the Band-Aid,” town councilman Matthew Hersh told Fox News Digital. 

The new Band Aid 20 CD single

The new Band Aid 20 CD single “Do They Know It’s Christmas,” at HMV in London’s Oxford Street.   
(Peter Jordan – PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images)

“It fits perfectly with our legacy of health care innovation.” 

Highland Park, he noted, has spawned other great contributions to the world of science and health care. 

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The community was home to Selman Waksman, who won the 1952 Nobel Prize in Medicine for discovering antibodies to battle tuberculosis; and Arno Allen Penzias, who won the 1978 Nobel Prize in Physics for research that helped establish the Big Bang Theory.

“We’re proud of Highland Park’s history as a witness to innovation in health care and progress,” Hersh said. “We’re proud of Earle Dickson.”

To read more stories in this unique “Meet the American Who…” series from Fox News Digital, click here

Source: https://www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/meet-american-who-invented-band-aids-cotton-buyer-devoted-husband-earle-dickson

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Prescription to party? Celebrations of life’s best moments are good for our health, study suggests

Most people don’t need an excuse to throw a party — yet it might just be what the doctor ordered.

Recent research suggests that celebrations might benefit our health and well-being, according to a paper published in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing, a peer-reviewed academic journal put out by the American Marketing Association.

The research showed that these celebrations need three components: 1) gathering with other people; 2) having food and drink; and 3) highlighting an important milestone.

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Celebrations reinforce participants’ social support and provide reassurance they have a social network when adversity strikes, the study’s press release indicated.

“Buying yourself a congratulatory gift to celebrate an accomplishment just isn’t the same as celebrating with a dinner and drinks with friends,’’ said lead author Danielle Brick, assistant marketing professor at the University of Connecticut in Storrs, Connecticut, in the study’s press release. 

Cheerful teenagers celebrating a birthday. "Perceived social support" is associated with a variety of health benefits, according to new research. 

Cheerful teenagers celebrating a birthday. “Perceived social support” is associated with a variety of health benefits, according to new research. 
(iStock)

Celebrations don’t necessarily need to be extravagant to be beneficial, Brick told Fox News Digital. 

“They just have to mark someone’s positive life event and involve food or drink with other people,” added Brick.

Variety of health benefits

Previous research defined “perceived social support” as the belief that people are there for you in times of future adversity. 

Perceived social support is associated with a variety of health benefits, including decreased mortality rates, better mental health outcomes, decreased levels of anxiety and depression, decreased heart rate, lower blood pressure and improved quality of sleep.

“We find that celebrations increase social support.”

“Social support has been consistently and repeatedly associated with better physical and mental health (including reducing anxiety and depression) in previous research — and our research contributes knowledge about an important first step to this process,” Brick told Fox News Digital. 

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Although perceived social support consistently leads to positive outcomes, actually receiving support, also known as “enacted support,” does not necessarily lead to positive outcomes, according to previous research.

In some cases, receiving support can lead to either no effect or negative effects.

A positive life event

A positive life event “could be a promotion, a successful task completed, the end of a busy week, a birthday, achieving a goal, or anything positive in your life,” said lead author Danielle Brick of a new study’s findings.
(iStock)

Based on these contradictory findings of perceived and enacted support, the researchers set out to discover how perceptions of social support originate, what influences these perceptions — and why enacted support does not function the same way as perceived social support. 

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Since celebrations are one common way that people can build perceptions of social support, the researchers focused their study on celebrations. 

‘Highlight someone’s positive life event’

The researchers performed eight experimental studies on thousands of participants to examine why celebrations are important, Brick said. 

From these studies, “We find that celebrations increase social support,” she told Fox News Digital.

“That means going out to eat or even making something special at home and eating with other people is enough — as long as you’re doing it to highlight someone’s positive life event.”

Celebrations and increased feelings of social support led participants to want to give back to their community, a new study's findings suggest.

Celebrations and increased feelings of social support led participants to want to give back to their community, a new study’s findings suggest.
(iStock)

Virtual celebrations will also work, as long as they involve the three important components: 1) gathering of people; 2) food and drink; and 3) acknowledging a life’s event. 

The benefits of celebrations extend beyond the people participating in them, according to a new study. 

A positive life event “could be a promotion, a successful task completed, the end of a busy week, a birthday, achieving a goal, or anything positive in your life,” Brick said.

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The study also found that celebrations and increased feelings of social support led participants to want to give back to their community — which suggests the benefits of celebrations extend beyond the people participating in them.

One limitation of the study, Brick noted, was that the research focused on shared consumption in the form of food and drink. 

"Policymakers should be aware of the downsides of limiting celebrations — and highlight ways to effectively celebrate with others."

“Policymakers should be aware of the downsides of limiting celebrations — and highlight ways to effectively celebrate with others.”
(iStock)

“We don’t know if other types of shared consumption besides food and drink — like going to a concert together with friends to mark a positive life event — would be as effective at increasing social support.”

Celebrations may benefit volunteerism

Brick, however, noted that the research suggested some meaningful policy implications. 

“Thinking back to the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, many of us were restricted in our ability to get together with others,” she told Fox News Digital.

After a celebration, those who feel supported are more willing to volunteer or donate to a cause. 

“This research suggests that policymakers should be aware of the downsides of limiting celebrations — and highlight ways to effectively celebrate with others.”

Nursing homes and community centers may also consider hosting celebrations for those who are at risk of loneliness and isolation, per the release.

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After a celebration, those who feel supported are more willing to volunteer or donate to a cause — so this can help fundraising, marketing and the organization of institutional and community events, the release added. 

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“This would be a good time for nonprofits to market donation campaigns, around the time many people are celebrating holidays, graduations, weddings and other big events,” Brick noted in the press release. 

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Reddit mom admits to feeling ‘hugely triggered’ by her own child as she tries ‘gentle parenting’

A mom shared a pressing parenting concern on Reddit recently — and asked for help.

The parenting philosophy known as “gentle parenting” has not been working for her, the concerned mother told the online community — and said she felt like “an emotional punching bag” for her four-year-old child.

“I was not raised by gentle parents and I knew I needed to do better for my kids, so I really latched onto the gentle parenting philosophy,” a Reddit user known as “mamaearthdumpling” wrote in the parenting subreddit in a post titled, “Gentle parenting burnout.”

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The post continued, “I’m now four years into it and I feel so burnt out after four years of validating emotions and being an emotional punching bag for my kid …”

The woman revealed that she’s burned out from “coming up with compromises” and “turning everything into a fun game” — and biting her tongue when her young son “gets hurt doing something I asked him not to do.”

Gentle parenting "focuses on fostering the qualities you want in your child by being compassionate and enforcing consistent boundaries," notes one parenting site. But one mom is having a very tough time with it — and wanted help from others.

Gentle parenting “focuses on fostering the qualities you want in your child by being compassionate and enforcing consistent boundaries,” notes one parenting site. But one mom is having a very tough time with it — and wanted help from others.
(iStock)

But what is gentle parenting, anyway?

‘Fostering the qualities you want’

It’s made up of four main elements, according to parenting website Verywellfamily.com. The elements of gentle parenting are “empathy, respect, understanding and boundaries.”

Gentle parenting “focuses on fostering the qualities you want in your child by being compassionate and enforcing consistent boundaries,” the site points out.  

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“Unlike some more lenient parenting methods, gentle parenting encourages age-appropriate discipline that teaches valuable life lessons,” it also says.

“I’ve resorted to raising my voice more often than I like and threatening [a] loss of privileges.”

The parenting style embraces “understanding a child’s feelings at the moment and responding accordingly in a way that is beneficial to the child’s emotional well-being,” Verywellfamily says.

The Reddit poster continued sharing her situation, admitting, “I feel like I just can’t do it anymore.”

She added, “Gentle parenting doesn’t come naturally to me, so every time [her child] yells or screams, I consciously have to work hard not to get triggered myself, and I’m just exhausted.”

"Gentle parenting doesn’t come naturally to me, so every time" her child yells or screams at her, said one frazzled mom (not pictured), "I consciously have to work hard not to get triggered myself, and I’m just exhausted."

“Gentle parenting doesn’t come naturally to me, so every time” her child yells or screams at her, said one frazzled mom (not pictured), “I consciously have to work hard not to get triggered myself, and I’m just exhausted.”
(iStock)

Noting that she still admires the philosophy, the mom said that “in a perfect world,” she would love to be a “100% gentle parent.”

She also said she’s beginning to feel “a massive lack of empathy when my child is screaming the house down or [whining] or demanding things from me.” 

She said she’s “resorted to raising my voice more often than I like, and threatening him with loss of privileges.”

“I was a raging mess — and I tried every parenting system under the sun to fix it.”

The Redditor continued, “I would love some advice to get back on track to being the best parent I can be …”

She said she regularly feels “hugely triggered” by her child and is “finding it hard to self-regulate, let alone co-regulate.”

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Fox News Digital reached out to the Redditor for additional comment.

Wanted to ’do better’

One California-based expert said that if a parent isn’t taking care of her own mental health first, then parenting willpower “will only last so long.” 

“Just like this Reddit mom, I wanted to ‘do better’ for my children when I became a parent 14 years ago,” Stef Tousignant, a former nanny and a parenting expert for Parentdifferently.com, told Fox News Digital in an email.

After she became a mother, one parenting expert said she was "shocked" by how "triggered" she became by her own kids. 

After she became a mother, one parenting expert said she was “shocked” by how “triggered” she became by her own kids. 
(iStock)

“But unlike her,” she continued, “as a professional nanny I already had a decade of caregiving under my belt.”

She continued, “No matter the parenting style of the home, I did my job and I did it well — because I went home every night and took care of myself.”

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After she became a mother, however, Tousignant was “shocked” by how “triggered” she was by her own kids.

“No longer ‘Mary Poppins,’ I was a raging mess — and I tried every parenting system under the sun to fix it,” she continued.

“Behaviors such as screaming, whining or demanding are not behaviors that need to be tolerated to be in line with gentle parenting.”

“Still, nothing changed until I turned the magnifying glass on myself and started caring for my mental health through therapy, mindfulness, physical exercise and sleep,” she also said.

“That’s when things changed,” Tousignant noted — “and gentle parenting became as simple as it professes itself to be.”

Parenting can be exhausting, and it’s “not uncommon” to feel “drained and emotionally overloaded” at times, said one Pennsylvania mental health professional.

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“Gentle parenting is based on the idea that we need to let our children become more self-aware and [be able to] self-regulate,” Natalie Bernstein, a psychologist in the Pittsburgh area, told Fox News Digital.

Clear and consistent boundaries can be helpful for all children and can be enforced "while still educating about emotions and allowing the child to express them," said one psychologist.

Clear and consistent boundaries can be helpful for all children and can be enforced “while still educating about emotions and allowing the child to express them,” said one psychologist.
(iStock)

This approach, however, does not mean that parents “engage in a hands-off approach” or “do not need to discipline or guide their children,” she said. 

Clear and consistent boundaries can be helpful for all children, Bernstein noted, and can be enforced “while still educating about emotions and allowing the child to express them.”

Bernstein emphasized, “Without structure and discipline, it is easy to cross the line into permissive parenting.”

“I would encourage the mother to consider therapy for herself and/or her family …”

She also said, “Behaviors such as screaming, whining or demanding are not behaviors that need to be tolerated to be in line with gentle parenting.”

In addition, she said, if the parents are not consistent with this parenting model, “confusion can arise.”

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Bernstein said in regard to the Reddit mom, “I would encourage the mother to consider therapy for herself and/or her family in order to feel more balanced and less overwhelmed in the home.”

"Kids feel loved when they have boundaries," Michigan-based pediatrician Meg Meeker told Fox News Digital.

“Kids feel loved when they have boundaries,” Michigan-based pediatrician Meg Meeker told Fox News Digital.
(iStock)

She said that “there are many research-supported parenting programs that can be effective and can reduce household stress.

One Michigan-based physician with over 30 years’ experience said discipline is crucial for a child’s development.

“After 32 years of practicing pediatrics and listening to thousands of kids, I can tell you exactly what the parents of strong, happy, well-adjusted kids did,” Dr. Meg Meeker shared with Fox News Digital via email.

“Gentle parenting means kind parenting — not powerless parenting.”

These parents “set firm limits” and let the child know that they were in charge — not the child, said Meeker. 

“Someone needs to teach boundaries,” she said.

These parents also “always allowed the child to feel what they felt” — but they never allowed those feelings to affect making the right decisions for the child’s best interests, Meeker also said.

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These successful parents also understood that “kids feel loved when they have boundaries,” Meeker emphasized.

“Not taking back your authority is cruel to both of you,” said Meeker. 

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“Gentle parenting means kind parenting — not child-centered, powerless parenting.”

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Lifestyle

Fresh vegetables and other fresh food can be yours at home with planning, purpose: Connecticut farmers

With the high price of food today, more and more people are looking into growing their own fresh vegetables at home — and doing more hands-on planning and harvesting as a result.

Joe and Ida DeFrancesco of Farmer Joe’s Gardens in Connecticut joined “Fox & Friends Weekend” on Sunday to explain how to start growing food at home — and how to take on more responsibility for it rather than relying on grocery stores or other outlets when prices are rising.

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The couple first displayed some very young tomato plants.

“Even in the city, you can grow your own vegetables,” said Joe DeFrancesco, as he displayed container gardening, including pots holding both tomato plants and lettuce plants.

People can harvest their own tomatoes virtually all summer once they properly set up the plants, said the owners of a small family farm during an appearance on "Fox and Friends Weekend."

People can harvest their own tomatoes virtually all summer once they properly set up the plants, said the owners of a small family farm during an appearance on “Fox and Friends Weekend.”
(iStock)

He mentioned that people can find themselves harvesting tomatoes almost all summer long once they properly set up the plants. 

As the plants grow, they’ll need to be transferred into bigger and different pots — and in some cases, people will need to fence in their gardens to prevent wildlife from munching and crunching on them, he said.

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“Deer need an eight-foot fence,” he said.

He said that indeed, his small business is finding that many more people today want to do their own vegetable gardening.

Given today's high prices, more people are showing an interest in starting their own home gardens — and they can get started right now, said farmer Joe DeFrancesco on

Given today’s high prices, more people are showing an interest in starting their own home gardens — and they can get started right now, said farmer Joe DeFrancesco on “Fox and Friends Weekend” on Sunday.  
(iStock)

And if that doesn’t work for them, he said, then they can visit their local farmers for fresh produce.

Ida DeFrancesco brought along a chicken from the couple’s farm — and explained that people can try having chickens at their own home in a “stress-free” manner.

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The farm offers a six-month program, she said, and provides the coop, the feed and the chickens.

But if people “chicken out” and find “it’s not for them,” she said — then “we take them back to the farm,” she said. 

She said it “takes about six to eight months for the chickens,” once they’ve hatched, to begin laying eggs.

In light of the high price of eggs, more Americans are showing an interest in acquiring or renting chickens at home in order to get their own fresh eggs. 

In light of the high price of eggs, more Americans are showing an interest in acquiring or renting chickens at home in order to get their own fresh eggs. 
(iStock)

“It’s a $50 deposit to get you started,” she said.

And then “you figure out which coop that you want,” said DeFrancesco, depending on whether families prefer larger or smaller set-ups.

With four chickens laying eggs, Ida DeFrancesco said people can expect to see about two dozen fresh eggs a week.

With four chickens laying eggs, Ida DeFrancesco said people can expect to see about two dozen fresh eggs a week.
(iStock)

With four chickens a week, she said people can expect to see about two dozen eggs a week.

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“Rent a chicken” businesses are increasingly cropping up, providing availability for the temporary use of chickens. 

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To learn more, watch the video at the top of this article, or click here to see it.

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