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Dozens fall ill at teen’s sushi restaurant birthday bash, but raw fish may not be to blame

Source image: https://www.foxnews.com/us/dozens-fall-ill-teens-sushi-restaurant-birthday-bash-raw-fish-may-not-be-blame

Eleven 13-year-olds went out to a birthday lunch Saturday and wound up being rushed to the hospital after an apparent food poisoning sickened more than two dozen people, according to New York health officials.

But the culprit doesn’t appear to be raw fish or any other type of meat, according to the birthday girl’s mother.

“The common denominator seemed to be the rice,” Arial Arias told Fox News Digital on Monday. The girls ordered different meals — chicken, beef, vegetables — but they all came with rice.

The unsettling scene left victims “projectile vomiting” inside and outside the Kumo Sushi and Steakhouse, a popular Long Island restaurant near Stony Brook University, according to witnesses.

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Kumo Sushi and Steakhouse viewed from street

Kumo Sushi and Steakhouse, a popular Long Island hibachi restaurant and sushi bar, was the scene of a panic Saturday when more than two dozen people reported food poisoning symptoms. (Fox News Digital)

Arias and other parents left the kids to themselves at a table and sat at the bar, where no one got sick, despite ordering seafood.

“We didn’t get sick from the sushi — they all got sick from the hibachi,” she said. “It was like the opposite of what you would have thought.”

Now Arias’ daughter and 10 friends, all on the same competitive dance team, are suffering from anxiety and lingering stomach pain and worried about whether they’ll be able to make their next competition, she said. They sat down to eat around 2 p.m. and were all sick before 4 p.m., she said.

The birthday girl initially wanted to bring her friends to a nearby Italian restaurant, Arias said.

“I said, ‘Oh, Kumo, it’s more of an experience,'” she said of the hibachi-style Kumo Sushi and Steakhouse, where the family has dined many times before. “It’s so much more fun. I kind of forced her into it — so I have so much guilt that she didn’t even want to do it there. And this happened.”

MEAT CONTAMINATED WITH E. COLI COULD CAUSE HALF A MILLION URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS EACH YEAR, STUDY FINDS 

Sign in front of Kumo Sushi and Steakhouse

National food poisoning lawyer Jory Lange said he suspects the issue to be rice contaminated with bacillus cereus, which releases toxins when cooked rice is left out at room temperature. (Fox News Digital)

In addition to the teens, more than a dozen people at another table also grew ill, county health officials said. The other party included a pregnant woman and another who appeared to be in her 90s, Arias said.

“It was one other group that was there before us — they were vomiting first in the bathroom,” Arias said. “So the girls were telling me they thought that, the lady, [who] was vomiting all over, had a stomach virus, and the girls were getting nervous.”

In all, 12 people were taken to the nearby hospital and 28 reported various symptoms, according to News 12 Long Island. Suffolk County health officials cited the restaurant for 15 alleged violations.

The county executive’s office did not immediately respond to questions from Fox News Digital.

Arias said health investigators told her the restaurant’s refrigerator may have been damaged. The investigation remains ongoing and authorities were still conducting interviews Monday, she said.

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A person who answered the phone at Kumo Monday told Fox News Digital that the owner was not available and that the restaurant was deferring to a lawyer for comment. The lawyer did not immediately respond to a call.

In a statement, owners Tony and Bobby Lam thanked first responders and health officials and said they were working “diligently” attempting to regain their customers’ faith.

Kumo Sushi and Steakhouse side view

An American flag flies above Kumo Sushi and Steakhouse, a popular restaurant from which an entire party of 13-year-old girls had to be taken to a hospital Saturday with food poisoning symptoms. (Fox News Digital)

“At Kumo restaurant, we consider our patrons an extension of our family, and your wellbeing remains our top priority,” they said. “We are committed to learning from this incident, enhancing our practices, and ensuring that every visit to Kumo is not just a meal but a memorable and safe experience.”

Jory Lange, a national attorney for food poisoning victims whose office has opened its own investigation into the case, told Fox News Digital that the rapid onset of symptoms, coupled with the possibility that all the victims ate rice in particular, is a clue toward the type of bacteria that likely sickened the guests.

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“That really, really short timeframe, less than an hour, combined with the fact that the health department is concerned about how cooked rice was stored, really point towards a bug called bacillus cereus,” he said.

Kumo’s full statement (Mobile users go here)

The bacteria is common in uncooked rice but remains in a harmless state until the rice is cooked and then left out at room temperatures, he said. If cooked rice is left at room temperature, the bacillus cereus spores begin to release toxins that can cause food poisoning, he said.

Anyone who is experiencing food poisoning symptoms should get checked out by a doctor, he said, and victims may be entitled to legal claims for expenses like medical bills and lost wages.

Bacillus cereus Laboratory Microbial Growth Promotion Test

Bacillus cereus grown in a laboratory dish. The bacteria can release toxins if left out at room temperature with cooked rice. (iStock)

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“Food poisoning in a restaurant is always a completely preventable thing,” he said. “It doesn’t just happen. It happens when someone does something wrong.”

As for the teens, they are “on the mend” but exhausted after the experience, Arias said Monday.

“My daughter still will not eat,” she said. “She doesn’t want to go out to eat after this… It was very traumatic.”

Next year, she said, maybe she’ll cook at home.

Source: https://www.foxnews.com/us/dozens-fall-ill-teens-sushi-restaurant-birthday-bash-raw-fish-may-not-be-blame

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Football favorites: 5 tips for how to host the best tailgate party this sports season

Fall is a time for pumpkin spice, autumn leaves, cooler temperatures — and football. 

Tailgating is one of the many ways Americans celebrate the football season, whether that’s college football or NFL games. 

From hot dogs to beer — from soups to nuts — people around the country often spend hours planning the perfect tailgate.

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Fox News Digital spoke with two experts for their inside tips on how to throw the best tailgate this season. 

First up, celebrity chef Robert Irvine — also known as the host of “Restaurant: Impossible” — shared with Fox News Digital some of his best advice. 

Tailgate season tips

Chef Robert Irvine, host of “Restaurant: Impossible,” shared his top tips for this year’s tailgating season.  (Paul Sirochman Photography)

Irvine’s Food Network show “Restaurant: Impossible” has been running for 21 seasons. 

1. Simple is the way to go

“Whenever possible, keep it simple,” Irvine emphasized. 

To this end, the Tampa, Florida-based chef recommended splurging on pre-cut fruits and veggies, pre-marinated meats or bottled marinades. 

INFLATION HITS TAILGATING: HOW TO TACKLE THE HIGH COSTS THIS FOOTBALL SEASON

He also recommended using disposable items such as paper plates, aluminum cooking trays and more to make the clean-up easier. 

“The last thing you want to do is have to come home and clean everything after a long day,” he said. 

Irvine also said that having others bring items for the tailgate, such as a potluck arrangement, can help take the pressure off. 

Students at Ohio State University

Robert Irvine said one of his best tailgating tips for this fall is to keep things simple. He said that “when everyone participates, it’s not a huge burden on one person with costs, setup and breakdown or cleanup.” (Adam Cairns/Columbus Dispatch/Imagn)

“When everyone participates, it’s not a huge burden on one person with costs, setup and breakdown or cleanup,” he said. 

2. Keep safety top of mind

The chef also emphasized the importance of making sure you’re up-to-date with proper safety precautions and regulations whenever you’re hosting a tailgate party. 

For instance, “do not push your hot grill under the car or truck before you go into the game,” he said. 

7 TIPS TO SURVIVING TAILGATING SEASON

“Leave it out next to the vehicle or detach any fuel,” he added. 

He also recommended bringing along a first aid kit to ensure the proper items are around just in case they’re needed. 

hamburger grilling

Chef Irvine recommended ensuring the grill is taken care of at the tailgate — and that it’s properly turned off before everyone heads over to the game.  (iStock)

Irvine also said to be sure there’s a designated driver when alcohol is being consumed. 

3. Don’t forget essentials — come prepared

Irvine said the key to good preparation is remembering the small things when packing for the tailgate — such as cords, chargers, a canopy and more. 

After that, he recommended bringing “a large portable TV to set up for pre-game, speakers for music, a football to toss around, plus corn hole or a couple other games to play,” he said.

Irvine also suggested bringing a large thermal cup to keep your beverage cool — especially in the hotter months near the beginning of football season. 

Tailgate must-haves

Chef Irvine said to remember to bring the essentials — things you’d might take for granted on the home front. (Utensils, anyone?)  (iStock)

Bringing utensils for the grill is also something that might slip your mind when packing. 

“Make sure to have an apron, so you stay clean for the game [and] some simple tools like a cutting board, knife, tongs and a spatula for burgers,” he said. 

Next up, a hosting expert also shared her tips for tailgating season …

4. Pack the cooler properly

Virginia Lane is a 34-year-old content creator from Savannah, Georgia, known for sharing tips and tricks on social media to her over 240,000 Instagram followers. 

She told Fox News Digital about her popular hack for keeping food and drinks from becoming soggy and wet in the cooler. 

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“Use small waste bins inside your cooler [and] place a small amount of ice at the bottom of the bin,” she said.

Lane said to them place the drinks in the bottom, iced section — and the food in the bins to ensure they don’t get soggy from lying in the ice.  

Tailgating tips

Lane recommended to others her viral TikTok hack for keeping items dry and cool in the cooler.  (iStock)

Her viral TikTok video about the hack has over 26,000 views on the social media platform. 

Lane also shared a tailgating tip for keeping the tailgating space organized amid the chaos of the party …

5. Keep your tailgating space organized

She recommended getting a closet organizer to make a pantry look under the tent — mainly to guarantee guests can see the food options. 

“You will be the most popular tent at the game.”

Lane also said to use a collapsible laundry bin to function as a trash can, which can be reused for the next party. 

Tailgating tips

Lane (pictured here) suggested that organizing your space well at the tailgate can be extremely beneficial.  (Virginia Lane)

Lastly, the content creator suggested using a garden flag as a paper towel holder for easy access to napkins for guests. 

“You will be the most popular tent at the game,” she said. 

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The American Tailgater Association (ATA) says that approximately 20 to 50 million people tailgate each year. 

Chef Robert Irvine plus social media influencer Virginia Lane shared their top hacks and best advice for how to throw a great party this football season.  (Paul Sirochman Photography/iStock/Virginia Lane)

The Green Bay Packer fans claim they coined the term “tailgating.” 

Even so, the first known tailgate event was during the First Battle of Bull Run in 1861, according to the ATA. 

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College football tailgating was thought to have begun in 1869 in a game between Princeton University and Rutgers University.  

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle.

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Lifestyle

King’s Hawaiian ‘Slider Sunday’ recipes are perfect for the whole family

HAWAIIAN HAM AND SWISS SLIDER

PREP: 10 min. COOK: 20 min. SERVES: 12

INGREDIENTS

24 slices of deli honey ham

6 slices of Swiss cheese, cut into fourths

1/3 cup mayonnaise

1 tablespoon poppy seeds

1 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

1/2 cup butter melted

1 tablespoon onion powder

1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

2 packages (12 count) KING’S HAWAIIAN Original Hawaiian Sweet Dinner Rolls

INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Cut KING’S HAWAIIAN rolls in half and spread mayo onto 1 side of the rolls. Place a slice or two of ham and slice of Swiss cheese in roll. Replace the top of the rolls and bunch them closely together into a baking dish.

2. In a medium bowl, whisk together poppy seeds, Dijon mustard, melted butter, onion powder and Worcestershire sauce.

3. Pour sauce over the rolls, just covering the tops. Cover with foil and let sit for 10 minutes.

4. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes or until cheese is melted. Uncover and cook for additional 2 minutes until tops are slightly browned and crisp. Serve warm.

PEPPERONI PIZZA SLIDERS

PREP: 10 min. COOK: 20 min. SERVES: 12

INGREDIENTS

1 pack King’s Hawaiian Sweet Slider Buns

1 jar Rao’s Homemade Pizza Sauce

9 slices fresh mozzarella

1 bag grated mozzarella

1 bag pepperoni

1 bottle crushed red pepper

3 tbsp butter

1 tsp Italian seasoning

1 1/2 tsp garlic powder

1 bag grated Parmesan cheese

PREPARATION

1. On a baking sheet or grill pan, assemble sliders using King’s Hawaiian Sweet Slider Buns with Rao’s Homemade Pizza Sauce, fresh mozzarella, pepperoni, grated mozzarella, and crushed red pepper.

2. Mix melted butter with Italian seasoning and garlic powder, then brush on top of slider buns.

3. Sprinkle grated parmesan on top of slider buns, then cover sliders with foil and bake at 350 degrees for 10 minutes, then remove foil and bake an additional 10 minutes.

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High blood pressure a concern worldwide, leading to death, stroke, heart attack: How to stop a ‘silent killer’

The World Health Organization (WHO) has just published its first report on the global impact of hypertension and how people can win the race against this “silent killer” that often presents without symptoms. 

“This important report from WHO shows how high blood pressure is common and growing in prevalence, but is under-detected and under-treated globally,” Dr. Deepak L. Bhatt, director of Mount Sinai Heart at the Icahn School of Medicine in New York City, told Fox News Digital. 

“This is despite the existence of known lifestyle measures (such as dietary salt reduction and weight loss) and generic medicines that are effective in controlling blood pressure in the majority of patients if implemented appropriately — which is what health care systems around the world need to do now,” he added in an email.

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High blood pressure affects one in three adults globally.

It has serious health consequences if it’s left untreated. Those consequences include stroke, heart attack, heart failure and kidney issues, according to the report. 

doctor checks patient's blood pressure

A doctor checks a patient’s blood pressure. The WHO says the number of people living with a blood pressure of 140/90 or higher or taking a medication to treat it doubled from 1990 to 2019 from 650 million to 1.3 billion.  (iStock)

Dr. Marc Siegel, a professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center and a Fox News medical contributor, commented to Fox News Digital on the issue, “High blood pressure is simple and important to understand.”

He said, “The heart is a pump — and it is pumping against resistance. The greater the resistance from the arteries, the more pressure on the heart and the more likely it could fail, or be damaged by insufficient blood flow or develop an abnormal rhythm and throw off a clot (stroke) or increase pressure on the kidneys, which causes them to fail.”

Approximately 120 million Americans — or 48% of adults in the U.S. — either have Stage 1 hypertension or are taking medication for hypertension, but only 1 in 4 adults have their blood pressure under control.

He noted, “High blood pressure affects multiple organs, damaging them.”

What is blood pressure?

The arteries carry blood from the heart to other parts of the body, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

Blood pressure is the pumping of the blood against the wall of arteries, according to the CDC.

In 2017, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association lowered the threshold of what defines high blood pressure to at or above 130/80 mmHg, which is known as Stage 1 hypertension. 

Blood pressure

A nurse takes the blood pressure of a hospital patient. “Hypertension can be controlled effectively with simple, low-cost medication regimens, and yet only about one in five people with hypertension have controlled it,” WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, noted in a news release. (iStock)

Approximately 120 million Americans — or 48% of adults in the U.S. — either have Stage 1 hypertension or are taking medication for hypertension, but only 1 in 4 adults have their blood pressure under control, according to the CDC.

Stage 2 hypertension is defined as 140/90 mmHg or higher. 

The WHO notes that the number of people living with a blood pressure of 140/90 or higher or taking a medication to treat the condition doubled from 1990 to 2019 from 650 million to 1.3 billion. 

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that you “know your numbers” if you think your blood pressure is in an unhealthy range. 

Approximately half of people worldwide are living with hypertension without being aware of the chronic medical condition.

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The vast majority — 75% — of people living with hypertension reside in low- and middle-income countries. 

A preventable disease 

“Hypertension can be controlled effectively with simple, low-cost medication regimens, and yet only about one in five people with hypertension have controlled it,” WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, noted in a news release.

If more people are appropriately treated for high blood pressure that mirrors levels of high-performing countries, this may prevent 76 million deaths, 120 million strokes, 79 million heart attacks and 17 million cases of heart failure between now and 2050, the WHO predicted in its release. 

young woman with heart issue

The American Heart Association reminds people to practice heart-healthy eating, which includes a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and watching sodium intake. AHA recommends a daily sodium intake of no more than 2,300 milligrams (mg) a day — but ideally no more than 1,500 mg per day for those with high blood pressure.  (iStock)

High-performing countries, such as Canada and South Korea, initiated national treatment programs resulting in more than 50% adults living in those areas with blood pressure that is now under control. 

But effective blood pressure management can occur in countries of all income levels. 

Over 40 low- and middle-income countries, such as Cuba, Bangladesh, India and Sir Lanka, have enrolled over 17 million people into treatment programs.

Use less sodium, get more exercise

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends that you “know your numbers” if you think your blood pressure is in an unhealthy range. 

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They recommend checking blood pressure regularly after a diagnosis of hypertension and to trend blood pressure measurements over time. 

The association reminds people to practice heart-healthy eating, which includes a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and watching sodium intake.

One simple lifestyle change is to skip the table salt.

AHA recommends a daily sodium intake of no more than 2,300 milligrams (mg) a day but ideally no more than 1,500 mg per day for those with high blood pressure. 

The CDC notes the average American has more than 3,400 mg of sodium every day, but one simple lifestyle change is to skip the table salt.

In 2013, all 194 countries who are members of the WHO committed to reducing sodium intake by 30% by 2025, but only 5% have implemented comprehensive strategies so far, according to a recent report. 

5 GREAT WAYS THAT MORNING EXERCISE CAN SET YOU UP FOR A BETTER WORKDAY

The association also recommends people look for the “Heart-Check mark” on certain food packaging that meets AHA criteria for saturated fat, trans fat and sodium for a single serving of the food product for healthy people over age 2.

Getting exercise is also important to control one’s blood pressure

Yoga at the park

Weekly physical activity can be spread out throughout the week, with an easy plan to remember perhaps 30 minutes a day for at least five days a week. People should also participate in muscle-strengthening activity at least two days each week, the American Heart Association says. (iStock)

This equates to at least 150 minutes each week of moderate-intensity physical activity, such as brisk walking in most healthy people.

The weekly physical activity can be spread out throughout the week, with an easy plan to remember perhaps 30 minutes a day for at least five days a week. 

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People should also participate in muscle-strengthening activity at least two days each week.

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More than 1,000 people die from strokes and heart attacks every hour — yet most of these deaths are preventable by controlling blood pressure, according to Dr. Tom Frieden, president and CEO of the organization Resolve to Save Lives.

Melissa Rudy of Fox News Digital contributed reporting. 

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